Putting God Back Into Theology » Bill Muehlenberg’s CultureWatch

Posted: December 11, 2013 in Quotes, Theology
Tags: , , , , ,
English: Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851-...

English: Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851-1921) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The great American theologian B. B. Warfield (1851-1921) delivered a lecture on October 4, 1911 at Princeton Theological Seminary entitled, “The Religious Life of Theological Students”. (OK, personal interest story here: I knew this was a thin volume, and as part of my 6,000 volume library, would not be easy to find. It took me forever to locate it: not only was it thinner than I remembered, but it was buried between some books on Marxism!)

So I dug that volume off the shelves and re-read it. Although very brief, it contains a number of gems. Let me share just a few with you:

A minister must be learned, on pain of being utterly incompetent for his work. But before and above being learned, a minister must be godly.

Nothing could be more fatal, however, than to set these two things over against one another. Recruiting officers do not dispute whether it is better for soldiers to have a right leg or a left leg: soldiers should have both legs. Sometimes we hear it said that ten minutes on your knees will give you a truer, deeper, more operative knowledge of God than ten hours over your books. “What!” is the appropriate response, “than ten hours over your books, on your knees?” Why should you turn from God when you turn to your books, or feel that you must turn from your books in order to turn to God?

There is certainly something wrong with the religious life of a theological student who does not study. But it does not quite follow that therefore everything is right with his religious life if he does study. It is possible to study—even to study theology—in an entirely secular spirit.

via Putting God Back Into Theology » Bill Muehlenberg’s CultureWatch.

simul iustus et peccator,

Eric Adams

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